Research publications

Found 1301 publicacions matching the indicated search criteria.
Sorigue M, Sarrate E, Delcastillo J

Triple therapy with dual antiplatelet treatment and direct oral anticoagulants.

Eur. J. Intern. Med. Jan 2018, 47 e20. Epub 11 Jul 2017More information
Motlló C, Ribera JM, Morgades M, Granada I, Montesinos P, Mercadal S, González-Campos J, Moreno MJ, Barba P, Cervera M, Barrios M, Novo A, Bernal T, Hernández-Rivas JM, Abella E, Amigo ML, Tormo M, Martino R, Lavilla E, Bergua J, Serrano A, García-Belmonte D, Guàrdia R, Grau J, Feliu E

Frequency and prognostic significance of additional cytogenetic abnormalities to the Philadelphia chromosome in young and older adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Leuk. Lymphoma Jan 2018, 59 (1) 146-154. Epub 30 May 2017
About 25-35% of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia show the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. Few series have evaluated the prognosis of additional cytogenetic alterations (ACA) to the Ph chromosome. We analyzed the frequency, type and prognostic significance ofACA in adults (18-60 years) treated in the ALL-Ph-08 trial. Fifty-two out of 74 patients (70%) showed ACA and 19 (26%) presented monosomies associated with t(9;22) (monosomal karyotype, MK). Similar complete response (CR) rate, CR duration, overall survival and event-free survival (EFS) were observed in patients with or without ACA, but patients with MK showed shorter CR duration and EFS than the remaining. On multivariate analysis, the only variable with prognostic impact for CR duration and EFS was the presence of MK (p = .003 and p = .036, respectively). Although ACA associated with the Ph chromosome are frequent, only monosomies were associated with poor prognosis in this group of patients.
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Martínez-Cuadrón D, Montesinos P, Vellenga E, Bernal T, Salamero O, Holowiecka A, Brunet S, Gil C, Benavente C, Ribera JM, Pérez-Encinas M, De la Serna J, Esteve J, Rubio V, González-Campos J, Escoda L, Amutio ME, Arnan M, Arias J, Negri S, Lowënberg B, Sanz MA

Long-term outcome of older patients with newly diagnosed de novo acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with ATRA plus anthracycline-based therapy.

Leukemia Jan 2018, 32 (1) 21-29. Epub 6 Jun 2017
Treatment outcome in older patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is lower compared with younger patients, mainly because of a higher induction death rate and postremission non-relapse mortality (NRM). This prompted us to design a risk- and age-adapted protocol (Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología (PETHEMA)/HOVON LPA2005), with dose reduction of consolidation chemotherapy. Patients aged ⩾60 years reported to the PETHEMA registry and were treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus anthracycline-based regimens according to three consecutive PETHEMA trials that were included. We compared the long-term outcomes of the LPA2005 trial with the preceding PETHEMA trials using non-age-adapted schedules (LPA96&LPA99). From 1996 to 2012, 389 older patients were registered, of whom 268 patients (69%) were eligible. Causes of ineligibility were secondary APL (19%), and unfit for chemotherapy (11%). Median age was 67 years, without relevant differences between LPA2005 and LPA96&LPA99 cohorts. Overall, 216 patients (81%) achieved complete remission with no differences between trials. The 5-year NRM, cumulative incidence of relapse, disease-free survival and overall survival in the LPA2005 vs the LPA96&99 were 5 vs 18% (P=0.15), 7 vs 12% (P=0.23), 87 vs 69% (P=0.04) and 74 vs 60% (P=0.06). A less intensive front-line regimen with ATRA and anthracycline monochemotherapy resulted in improved outcomes in older APL patients.
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Palomo L, Malinverni R, Cabezón M, Xicoy B, Arnan M, Coll R, Pomares H, García O, Fuster-Tormo F, Grau J, Feliu E, Solé F, Buschbeck M, Zamora L

DNA methylation profile in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia associates with distinct clinical, biological and genetic features.

Epigenetics 2018, 13 (1) 8-18. Epub 6 Feb 2018
Chromosomal abnormalities are detected in 20-30% of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and correlate with prognosis. On the mutation level, disruptive alterations are particularly frequent in chromatin regulatory genes. However, little is known about the consequential alterations in the epigenetic marking of the genome. Here, we report the analysis of genomic DNA methylation patterns of 64 CMML patients and 10 healthy controls, using a DNA methylation microarray focused on promoter regions. Differential methylation analysis between patients and controls allowed us to identify abnormalities in DNA methylation, including hypermethylation of specific genes and large genome regions with aberrant DNA methylation. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis identified two main clusters that associated with the clinical, biological, and genetic features of patients. Group 1 was enriched in patients with adverse clinical and biological characteristics and poorer overall and progression-free survival. In addition, significant differences in DNA methylation were observed between patients with low risk and intermediate/high risk karyotypes and between TET2 mutant and wild type patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that altered DNA methylation patterns reflect the CMML disease state and allow to identify patient groups with distinct clinical features.
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Torrent A, Ferrá C, Ribera JM

Rescue treatment of patients with relapsed acute leukemia after first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Med Clin (Barc) 30 Dec 2017, . Epub 30 Dec 2017More information
Palau A, Garz AK, Diesch J, Zwick A, Malinverni R, Valero V, Lappin K, Casquero R, Lennartsson A, Zuber J, Navarro T, Mills KI, Götze KS, Buschbeck M

Polycomb protein RING1A limits hematopoietic differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

Oncotarget 29 Dec 2017, 8 (70) 115002-115017. Epub 1 Dec 2017
Genetic lesions affecting epigenetic regulators are frequent in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Polycomb proteins are key epigenetic regulators of differentiation and stemness that act as two multimeric complexes termed polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2, PRC1 and PRC2, respectively. While components and regulators of PRC2 such as ASXL1 and EZH2 are frequently mutated in MDS and AML, little is known about the role of PRC1. To analyze the role of PRC1, we have taken a functional approach testing PRC1 components in loss- and gain-of-function experiments that we found overexpressed in advanced MDS patients or dynamically expressed during normal hematopoiesis. This approach allowed us to identify the enzymatically active component RING1A as the key PRC1 component in hematopoietic stem cells and MDS. Specifically, we found that RING1A is expressed in CD34
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Yamamoto M, Cid E, Yamamoto F

ABO blood group A transferases catalyze the biosynthesis of FORS blood group FORS1 antigen upon deletion of exon 3 or 4.

Blood Adv 26 Dec 2017, 1 (27) 2756-2766. Epub 20 Dec 2017
Evolutionarily related ABO and GBGT1 genes encode, respectively, A and B glycosyltransferases (AT and BT) and Forssman glycolipid synthase (FS), which catalyze the biosynthesis of A and B, and Forssman (FORS1) oligosaccharide antigens responsible for the ABO and FORS blood group systems. Humans are a Forssman antigen-negative species; however, rare individuals with Apae phenotype express FORS1 on their red blood cells. We previously demonstrated that the replacement of the LeuGlyGly tripeptide sequence at codons 266 to 268 of human AT with GBGT1-encoded FS-specific GlyGlyAla enabled the enzyme to produce FORS1 antigen, although the FS activity was weak. We searched for additional molecular mechanisms that might allow human AT to express FORS1. A variety of derivative expression constructs of human AT were prepared. DNA was transfected into COS1 (B3GALNT1) cells, and cell-surface expression of FORS1 was immunologically monitored. To our surprise, the deletion of exon 3 or 4, but not of exon 2 or 5, of human AT transcripts bestowed moderate FS activity, indicating that the A allele is inherently capable of producing a protein with FS activity. Because RNA splicing is frequently altered in cancer, this mechanism may explain, at least partially, the appearance of FORS1 in human cancer. Furthermore, strong FS activity was attained, in addition to AT and BT activities, by cointroducing 1 of those deletions and the GlyGlyAla substitution, possibly by the synergistic effects of altered intra-Golgi localization/conformation by the former and modified enzyme specificity by the latter.
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Van de Sompele S, Pécheux L, Couso J, Meunier A, Sanchez M, De Baere E

Functional characterization of a novel non-coding mutation "Ghent +49A > G" in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin causing hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome.

Sci Rep 21 Dec 2017, 7 (1) 18025. Epub 21 Dec 2017
Hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is a rare disorder usually caused by heterozygous mutations in the iron-responsive element (IRE) in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the L-ferritin gene (FTL), disturbing the binding of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) and the post-transcriptional regulation of ferritin expression. Here, the proband of a consanguineous family displayed moderate bilateral cataracts and elevated serum ferritin in the absence of iron overload. The parents and siblings showed variable degrees of mild bilateral cataracts combined with elevated levels of circulating ferritin. Sequencing of FTL identified a novel 5'UTR mutation c.-151A > G, also named "Ghent +49A > G". The zygosity of the mutation, occurring in homozygous and heterozygous state in the proband and other affected family members respectively, correlated well with severity of ophthalmological and hematological manifestations. The substitution is expected to impair the secondary structure of the upper IRE stem. Functional characterization of +49A > G by electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated a reduced binding affinity for IRP1 compared to the wild-type IRE of FTL. Overall, we have expanded the repertoire of deleterious biallelic FTL IRE mutations in HHCS with this novel +49A > G mutation, the zygosity of which correlated well with the disease expression.
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Rovó A, Kulasekararaj A, Medinger M, Chevallier P, Ribera JM, Peffault de Latour R, Knol C, Iacobelli S, Kanfer E, Bruno B, Maury S, Quarello P, Koh MBC, Schouten H, Blau IW, Tichelli A, Hill A, Risitano A, Passweg J, Marsh J, Dreger P, Dufour C

Association of aplastic anaemia and lymphoma: a report from the severe aplastic anaemia working party of the European Society of Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation.

Br. J. Haematol. 19 Dec 2017, . Epub 19 Dec 2017More information
Nomdedeu M, Pereira A, Calvo X, Colomer J, Sole F, Arias A, Gomez C, Luño E, Cervera J, Arnan M, Pomares H, Ramos F, Oiartzabal I, Espinet B, Pedro C, Arrizabalaga B, Blanco ML, Tormo M, Hernandez-Rivas JM, Díez-Campelo M, Ortega M, Valcárcel D, Cedena MT, Collado R, Grau J, Granada I, Sanz G, Campo E, Esteve J, Costa D

Clinical and biological significance of isolated Y chromosome loss in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. A report from the Spanish MDS Group.

Leuk. Res. Dec 2017, 63 85-89. Epub 28 Oct 2017
Isolate loss of chromosome Y (-Y) in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is associated to a better outcome but it is also well described as an age-related phenomenon. In this study we aimed to analyze the prognostic impact of -Y in the context of the IPSS-R cytogenetic classification, evaluate the clinical significance of the percentage of metaphases with isolated -Y, and test whether finding -Y may predispose to over-diagnose MDS in patients with borderline morphological features. We evaluated 3581 male patients from the Spanish MDS Registry with a diagnosis of MDS or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). -Y was identified in 177 patients (4.9%). Compared with the 2246 male patients with normal karyotype, -Y group showed a reduced risk of leukemic transformation that did not translate into a survival advantage. The overall survival and the risk of leukemic transformation were not influenced by the percentage of metaphases with -Y. The -Y group was not enriched in patients with minor morphologic traits of dysplasia, suggesting that the better outcome in the -Y group cannot be explained by enrichment in cases misdiagnosed as MDS. In conclusion, our results support the current recommendation of classifying patients with -Y within the very good risk category of the IPSS-R for MDS and rule out a selection bias as a possible explanation of this better outcome. An analysis of the molecular basis of MDS with isolated -Y would be of interest as it may provide a biological basis of protection against progression to acute leukemia.
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